August 16, 2014
"The story can’t be “I’m a victim,” and it also can’t be “I’m a hero,” though in some sense you’re telling of the hero’s journey. But what makes for an authentic personal story is that the hero is not you; the heroes are the people who put up with or helped you or accompanied you along the way. The star of the story is not you; the star is something greater than you. The astonishment of the story is never that the world finally recognized your genius and showered you with the love and attention you so richly deserve. Nor is the story that the world finally admitted its terrible betrayal of your innocence and apologized. The story is that a God exists who is so kind, so loving, so merciful, that he sees fit to forgive all your transgressions, wrong turns, and mistakes; a God who ministers, with infinite tenderness, to all the hurt that’s been done to you and all the hurt you’ve done to others, and welcomes you back to the banquet table."

An Alcoholic’s Tale of Death and Resurrection - Aleteia

August 16, 2014
"Thus began the Abbey’s long years of secrecy and terror. For centuries, even through the Penal Years – when Catholicism was outlawed and priests were hunted – Mass continued to be celebrated at the devastated Abbey and attended by the loyal townsfolk.This was often a very perilous thing to do. Paid informers were a constant danger.For 236 years, the local people were forced to hear Mass in the roofless Abbey church, completely open to the elements. A photograph from 1865 is witness to this, showing people kneeling on the grassy ground. Though the Mass has ended, they continue kneeling as the priest gives instruction to the children."

The Irish Abbey that Refused to Die - Aleteia

August 2, 2014
"True popular piety is born from that sensus fidei of which this conciliar document speaks and it guides in the devotion of the saints, of Our Lady, even with folk expressions in the good sense of the word. For this, popular piety is fundamentally enculturated. It cannot be a popular piety created in a laboratory, ascetic, but born always from our lives. Small mistakes can be made—therefore we must be vigilant—however, popular religiosity is a tool of evangelization."

Pope has casual Q&A with priests of Caserta Vatican Radio

August 2, 2014
"The Church acknowledges the legitimate role of profit as an indication that a business is functioning well. When a firm makes a profit, this means that productive factors have been properly employed and corresponding human needs have been duly satisfied. But profitability is not the only indicator of a firm’s condition. It is possible for the financial accounts to be in order, and yet for the people — who make up the firm’s most valuable asset — to be humiliated and their dignity offended. Besides being morally inadmissible, this will eventually have negative repercussions on the firm’s economic efficiency. In fact, the purpose of a business firm is not simply to make a profit, but is to be found in its very existence as a community of persons who in various ways are endeavouring to satisfy their basic needs, and who form a particular group at the service of the whole of society. Profit is a regulator of the life of a business, but it is not the only one; other human and moral factors must also be considered which, in the long term, are at least equally important for the life of a business"

No More Throne and Altar: St. JP2 on Inequality is the Root of Social Evil

August 2, 2014
"Our economy supports and encourages an increasingly childless workforce and fungible bonds, tenuous relationships to place and community, a dessicated “culture,” centralization and monopoly and crony capitalism, and a debased utilitarian calculation of value and success.
For starters, then, it would be refreshing to see the same energy and devotion exhibited by so many conservative Catholics on issues related to life, religious liberty and gay marriage, to issues related to a proper ordering of the economy. The first thing that one will be told in response is that these latter issues involve a great deal of prudence, and so don’t demand the same kind of energy and exertions as the former, which (in the case of abortion) is intrinsically evil. But I would rejoin that Catholics don’t properly think and act as Catholics if we treat these spheres as if they were autonomous and unrelated; indeed, it seems to me that basic economic arrangements that privilege individual autonomy, materialism, mobility at the expense of community, and an “amoral” market significantly and inescapably contribute to our comprehensively “disposable society” (using Pope Francis’s description of, among other things, our abortion regime"

The Neo-Conservative Imagination: An Interview with Patrick Deneen - Ethika Politika

August 2, 2014
"Sloan Simpson, the beautiful young fashion model who married New York’s handsome postwar Mayor, William O’Dwyer, divorced him after his term as Ambassador to Mexico and then became a darling of the jet set as the ruler of Acapulco society, died yesterday at her home in Dallas. She was 80. Friends said the cause was lung cancer, a disease that had previously cost her a lung but not her devotion to cigarettes. If ever there was a match made in tabloid heaven, it was surely the one between the former policeman, who had succeeded Fiorello H. La Guardia as Mayor of New York in 1946, and the well-bred Texas charmer who had come to the city as one of the ”long-stemmed beauties” of the John Powers modeling agency. There was, for example, the cute way they met, in 1948 at the old Grand Central Palace convention center on Lexington Avenue at a fashion show in connection with the golden jubilee celebration of the consolidation of the five boroughs.%"

Sloan Simpson, 80, an Ex-Model Who Married a New York Mayor - The New York Times

August 2, 2014
"Just the other day I heard a kid say “I haven’t had a drink for thirty days and I smiled yesterday. I haven’t smiled, really smiled, in ten years.” I would not wish alcoholism on my worst enemy but I would wish that experience—of seeing the light come back in the eyes of another human being—on every person on earth. You tear up, your heart swells with love, your whole life—all the pain, all the loneliness—was worth it. Just to have been alive to see this kid’s joy. That’s the kingdom. You don’t care if you die penniless, alone, and under a bridge. You know, “I have lived. I have known love.” In a way, I’m still on my knees in those woods in Nashville. “Deliver me from evil. Help me to learn how to love. Help me, for I can’t help myself.” It’s the prayer that saved me then. Twenty-six years later, it’s the prayer that saves me now."

The Prayer that Saved My Life - Aleteia

August 2, 2014
"“Prayer arises, if at all, from incompetence, otherwise there is no need of it.” - St. Thérèse of Lisieux"

The Prayer that Saved My Life - Aleteia

August 2, 2014
"I’d no idea in my life that I’d spend so much time writing about baseball,” muses an on-camera Roger Angell. Tomorrow, he will head to Cooperstown, New York, to be inducted into the Hall of Fame, for the words that have brought the game to readers for so many decades. Those words are now available in e-book form. To celebrate, Open Road Integrated Media produced this short video, exclusively available on newyorker.com; it’s the first in what will be a series of interviews with Angell. And, in preparation for tomorrow’s ceremonies, here are eight Angell classics from our archive"

Hall of Fame Weekend: Roger Angell’s Baseball Writing - The New Yorker

August 2, 2014
Kentucky uninsured rate plunged after Obamacare. One of the rare states were it was implemented enthusiastically.

Kentucky uninsured rate plunged after Obamacare. One of the rare states were it was implemented enthusiastically.

August 2, 2014
Forbes Field 1966. Look at the room behind the plate

Forbes Field 1966. Look at the room behind the plate

August 2, 2014

August 2, 2014

August 2, 2014
Father Martin’s take on the parable of the rich young man (Mark 10 17-30). For years I’ve read the passage with a furtive sense of guilt, thinking, I’m the rich young man. I’m always holding on to something. I can never quite measure up. Father Martin points out that years after becoming a priest, and reading the passage dozens of times, at last he noticed the one short phrase at verse 21 “Then Jesus, beholding him, loved him.”
Jesus looked at the rich young man with love. That changes everything. Jesus isn’t mad at the rich young man. He looks at him with love. All over again, I’m reminded that we’re works in progress. For the thousandth time, I remember There’s always hope.
angelusnews.com/entertainment/books/a-beautiful-chronicle-jesus-a-pilgrimage-5745/#.U90uA7t0zIV
August 2, 2014
"In 1999-2000, it seemed realistic to draw a sharp line of distinction between the vast majority of adults willing and able to work full-time—and thereby earn a living somewhere north of the poverty line—and the small minority of adults whose bad choices or bad situation rendered them dependent on public assistance. But for half a decade now, that distinction has looked blurry. The specific problem of poverty among those who don’t work full-time is no longer so easily separated from the broader problem of pervasive economic insecurity among those who do. Liberals and progressives have responded to this grim new reality with proposals for a much higher degree of direct and indirect government intervention in the economy. Conservatives wish to beat them back in order to protect market freedom. That disagreement will divide politics in the next decade. For conservatives to compete effectively, they will want to find ways to enhance economic security that do not put government in control. How to do so is the question that preoccupies the “reform conservatives” profiled in The New York Times Magazine last month. To date, the answers proposed do not meet the magnitude of the problem. Ryan’s pre-crisis version likewise falls short. Not only does it conceptualize the poverty challenge in a mistaken way, but it also will aggrav"

Paul Ryan’s Obsolete Thinking About Poverty - The Atlantic

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »